Friday, May 6, 2016



       Hello welcome back to our blog. What we have been doing the past few weeks is learning about the cells that live in our body, and the cells that are in other plants. Our teacher had us get into groups and come up with a mini lesson .One thing that we have done to help us remember what the cell wall is we played a game of dodge ball to help us remember what the cell wall does and there where three organelles that we had to protect by making our own cell walls and the other team would try to throw balls at the other teams cell wall and who ever knocked over the cell wall won and then we would repeat it. The next activity was not that fun or educational it did not teach us anything at all, and I am sorry but that is true. The one that taught us about chloroplast was really cool what we did was very cool because it talked about how it works and also what it does. We also saw our own cheek cells and onion cells. It was really fun learning about the different parts of the cell. Thanks for reading.

13 comments:

  1. Vivian I don't think that we should put bad parts about any lessons in our posts.

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    1. I honestly think that it is okay. As long as we are not saying how it was a terrible lesson, and I don't like the people in the group. I think that is rude, but the lesson didn't go well for her so it should be fine. But that is what you think and I will respect you on what you should

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  2. Vivian I don't think that we should put bad parts about any lessons in our posts.

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  4. I think that reflecting about what went wrong can be very beneficial. Just make sure that it is constructive criticism. I know that I reflect upon what goes wrong and it makes me a better a teacher.

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  5. It's nice to see your teacher implementing many different ways of learning. While it may not have worked for you, someone else may have had the ah ha moment from that lesson. How did you learn about chloroplast? With such a fun activity, my curiosity is peaked.

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  6. Hi, I think it is important to discuss both the good and the bad. I learned to do this when I was a young boy scout in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio – Troop 182 with Bob McIntire as my scout master. (Since I remember his name and how important he was to me after many, many years, I guess the good/bad conversation must have been significant to me?)
    After camping trips and events that took a great deal of effort to plan, the adults wanted to know what went right and what went wrong. They used to call it a “thorns and roses” conversation. They would ask “what went well?” These things were the roses. And “what didn’t go so well”? This stuff was the thorn or in our case was often a lot of thorns.
    These days, at work, we talk about what we should continue to do. This is good stuff that contributes to being successful. Then there are the things that we should stop doing. These things caused something bad to happen or didn’t add any benefit. The third thing we discuss is what we should start doing. This could be something that we forgot to do or discovered was missing. All of this adds to the “lesson learned”. We know we aren’t perfect and we learn from practice and making mistakes.
    I agree with Mrs. Wangeman. Reflecting on what we do gives us an opportunity to do things differently the next time and possibly in a better way.
    Keep up the good work! Joke: What do you call the leader of a biology gang?
    A: The Nucleus

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  7. A cute song on youtube about photosynthesis ... http://t.co/3cahM82QK7 I couldn't find any on organelles or chloroplast. These words must be harder to rhyme with?

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  9. Never be sorry for telling the truth! IF it is done in a kind and honest way both sides will benefit. Girls can like and be good at science is a truth I can believe in.

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  10. Constructive criticism is always good! If each student can comment on what worked and what did not work, and why, future students will benefit. That might mean changing the curriculum or just recognizing that different students learn differently. Some might benefit from playing dodgeball and some from studying diagrams. I'm glad you have the opportunity to try different things and figure out what works best for you.

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